Books

Books

Panthers and the Museum of Fire

by Jen Craig
with photos by Bettina Kaiser

$13.95 *Coming October 2020 
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A woman starts out from a quiet corner of Glebe in Sydney, Australia toward the bustle of Broadway and Surry Hills, carrying with her the manuscript of a child friend who has recently died. Her thoughts surge between past and present as she strives to understand the effect her friend’s manuscript, Panthers and the Museum of Fire, has had on her. Not only does the manuscript remind her of what she might prefer to forget—youthful ambitions, an abandoned friendship, entanglements with religion and anorexia—it also ignites in her a creative impulse.

JEN CRAIG’s short stories have appeared in various Australian literary magazines including HEAT, Redoubt, Hermes and Southerly. Her first novel, Since the Accident, was published by Ginninderra Press in 2009. She has collaborated on concert and theatre works, including the 2005 chamber opera, A Dictionary of Maladies, with Swiss composer Michael Schneider. Jen regularly blogs micro fiction at absurdenticements.blogspot.com and about writing and reading at beinginlieu.blogspot.com. She holds a Master of Arts in Writing from the University of Technology, Sydney, and is currently researching the relationship between writing, anorexia and the Gothic at the Writing and Society Research Centre, University of Western Sydney.

BETTINA KAISER is a visual artist as well as a graphic and web designer. She has undertaken artistic residencies in Antartica, at Arthur and Yvonne Boyd’s Bundanon and in Outback Australia. She won the 2007 Hazelhurst Art on Paper Prize and has exhibited throughout Australia as well as overseas.

Alexander Theroux: A Fan’s Notes

by Steven Moore

$19.95 *Coming September 2020 
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Since the publication of his first novel in 1972, Alexander Theroux has won great acclaim for his dazzling style and forceful intellect. That first novel, Three Wogs, was named Book of the Year by Encyclopedia Britannica and nominated for the National Book Award, as was his second novel, Darconville’s Cat (1981), which Anthony Burgess called one of the 99 best novels of the 20th century. Since then Theroux has published numerous other books, won several awards, and has been the subject of academic studies and theses. In addition to Burgess, he has been praised by such writers as Saul Bellow, Guy Davenport, Robertson Davies, Fred Exley, Jonathan Franzen, William H. Gass, Norman Mailer, D. Keith Mano, Cormac McCarthy, James McCourt, Annie Proulx, John Updike, and Paul West.

Alexander Theroux: A Fan’s Notes is the first book-length study of Theroux’s complete body of work—novels, fables and short stories, nonfiction books, poetry, literary journalism—concluding with a chapter on his contentious relationship with his best-selling brother Paul Theroux. Critic Steven Moore, who has known Theroux for nearly 40 years and helped with the publication of some of his books, illuminates Theroux’s work in a scholarly yet accessible style. While appreciative of most of what Theroux has written, Moore doesn’t shirk from what he regards as some of his weaker efforts in order to provide a balanced, deeply informed evaluation of this singular writer. Moore’s book will appeal to Theroux fans as well as to students of modern American literature.

STEVEN MOORE (PhD Rutgers, 1988) is the author/editor of several books on William Gaddis, as well as of The Novel: An Alternative History (2010, 2013). From 1988 to 1996 he was managing editor of the Review of Contemporary Fiction/Dalkey Archive Press.

My Back Pages

by Steven Moore

$30.00 hardcover, $23 softcover
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Before he embarked on his massive history of the novel, Steven Moore was best known as a tireless promoter of innovative fiction, mostly by way of hundreds of book reviews published from the late 1970s onward. Virtually all have been gathered for this collection, which offers a panoramic view of modern fiction, ranging from well-known authors like Barth and Pynchon to lesser-known but deserving ones, many published by small presses. Moore also reviews dozens of critical studies of this fiction, and takes some side trips into rock music and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

The second half of the book reprints Moore’s best essays. Several deal with novelist William Gaddis — on whom Moore is considered the leading authority — and other writers associated with him (Chandler Brossard, Alan Ansen, David Markson, Sheri Martinelli), all of which have been updated for this collection. Others champion such writers as Alexander Theroux, Brigid Brophy, Edward Dahlberg, Carole Maso, W. M. Spackman, and Rikki Ducornet. Two essays deal with the late David Foster Wallace, whom Moore knew, and others treat such matters as book reviewing, postmodernism, the Beat movement, maximalism, gay literature, punctuation, nympholepsy, and the history of the novel.

STEVEN MOORE (PhD Rutgers, 1988) is the author/editor of several books on William Gaddis, as well as of The Novel: An Alternative History (2010, 2013). From 1988 to 1996 he was managing editor of the Review of Contemporary Fiction/Dalkey Archive Press.

Novel Explosives

by Jim Gauer

$15.95
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IT’S THE WEEK AFTER EASTER, APRIL 13-20, AN OTHERWISE ORDINARY WEEK IN 2009… LATE in the week, a man wakes up in Guanajuato, Mexico, with his knowledge intact, but with no sense of who he is, or how he came to Guanajuato. EARLY in the week, a venture capital investor sits at his desk in Santa Monica, California, attempting to complete his business memoirs, but troubled by the fact that a recent deal appears to be some sort of money-laundering scheme. IN THE MIDDLE of the week, two gunmen for the Juárez Drug Cartel arrive at a small motel in El Paso, assigned to retrieve a suitcase full of currency, and eliminate the man who brought it to El Paso. THUS BEGINS the three-stranded narrative of Novel Explosives, a search for identity that travels through the worlds of venture capital finance, high-tech money-laundering methods, and the Juárez drug wars, a joyride of a novel with only one catch: the deeper into the book you go, the more dangerous it gets. JIM GAUER is a mathematician, published poet, and possibly the world’s only Marxist Venture Capitalist.

Zerogram Press